Hunting Nazi Treasure

Yesterday saw the release of our most recent episode of the History Slam Podcast over at Activehistory.ca. In this episode of the History Slam, I talk with two of the central figures behind the new History Channel series Hunting Nazi Treasure. First, I chat with Robert M. Edsel about The Monuments Men, the Monuments Men Foundation For the Preservation of Art, and the challenges of finding the art’s original home. I then talk with Series Producer Steve Gamester. We discuss the show’s investigative style, the production effort of shooting on location, and the difficulties in telling this story. The show debuts on Tuesday October 24 at 10 E/P. You can find the full post here and be sure to subscribe to the History Slam on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts.

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Shadow Red

2017 is the 100th anniversary of Tom Thomson’s death. Earlier this year, I talked with Gregory Klages about Thomson’s death and the many theories that have surrounded it for the past century. But that’s not all that’s been going on to mark the event. Last Thursday, a new art exhibition opened at Toronto’s ArteMbassy entitled Shadow Red. For the past three years, artist Martha Johnson has put together a series of works that pay homage to Thomson’s life and legacy.

In today’s episode of the History Slam, I talk with Martha Johnson about the exhibit. We chat about her personal connection to Tom Thomson, his legacy in Canada’s art community, and her artistic style. We also talk about the exhibit, using blankets as a canvas, what visitors can expect, and how nature has influenced Canadian art. The exhibit runs through October 1, so if you’re in the GTA, it’s definitely worth the trip. You can find the full post here.

 

Taxation and Democracy

In Wednesday’s episode of the History Slam, which is a special bonus episode as part of Activehistory.ca’s taxation week, I talk Shirley Tillotson of Dalhousie University. We chat about her new book Give and Take: The Citizen-Taxpayer and the Rise of Canadian Democracy, Elsbeth Heaman’s new book Tax, Order, and Good Government: A New Political History of Canada, 1867-1917, and the role of taxes in Canadian life. We also talk about how taxation has been written about by historians, the merits of a flat tax, and how people feel about government spending. You can find the full post here.

You can also subscribe to the History Slam on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts!

Reviewing the New Canada Hall at the Canadian Museum of History

A special Tuesday edition of the History Slam podcast was posted at Activehistory.ca this morning. In this episode, podcast Hall of Famers Aaron Boyes and Madeleine Kloske join me as we walk through the new Canada Hall. We give our thoughts before we head into the exhibit, break down each of the sections as we walk through, and even play one of the new interactive games. We then sit down following the visit and give our thoughts on the exhibit as a whole, its strengths and weaknesses, and give our grades for the revamped Canada Hall. You can find the full post here.

 

Unwritten Histories

The History Slam is back from its summer hiatus with new episodes. In this episode, I talk with Andrea Eidinger about her incredibly successful blog Unwritten Histories. We chat about the blog’s origins, the process of curating her lists, and how she manages to produce so much original content. We also talk about the state of the field in 2017, how history can be improved in schools, and what the future may hold for history in Canada. You can find the full post here.